Kaepernick Only Has Himself to Blame… Plus, Defending Your Brand

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Free agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick remains unsigned. There are some who feel he is being blackballed for taking a knee during the playing of the American national anthem before every game during the 2016 NFL season. Kaepernick is not being blackballed, rather he dug himself a hole that he can’t get out of. Despite the actions of Michael Bennett and Marshawn Lynch over the weekend, most if not all of Kaepernick’s momentum gained from his publicity stunt has disappeared. Even Kaepernick’s old team, the San Francisco 49ers, a team based in one of the most politically progressive cities in the United States, feels he has become more of a liability and did not make any effort to re-sign him. Nobody wants to be associated with a player who is not only against cops, but supports the violent demise of law enforcement officials who are charged with protecting the communities we live in, that includes front line police officers. The colour of one’s skin be damned. Kaepernick knows that and he has only himself to blame for his demise.

When the Miami Dolphins were looking for a quarterback to replace the injured Ryan Tannehill, they managed to lure Jay Cutler out of retirement and have him as their starter rather than Kaepernick. That caused many who cover the team and the NFL to scratch their heads and even sparked outrage. Liberal filmmaker Spike Lee is planning to hold a rally in New York City for Kaepernick prior to the start of the 2017 season. But what some fail to mention is during a news conference last season, Kaepernick proudly wore a t-shirt with the image of the late Cuban President Fidel Castro. To some people they say “so what”, but for many Cubans living in Miami who fled Castro’s tyranny, that display of affection towards a dictator is no different to praising Adolf Hitler. Former Miami Marlins Manager Ozzie Guillen learned that the hard way when he spoke highly of Castro during an interview in 2012. The backlash ensued and it became a distraction resulting in the Marlins finishing dead last in the division that year and it cost Guillen his job despite having 3 years and $7.5 Million left on his contract. The Dolphins obviously didn’t want to duplicate that fiasco.

Kaepernick’s political stance is not the only reason he has not landed a job on an NFL team. He still considers himself an elite quarterback but that is simply no longer the case. In fact, he is just a shell of himself. Kaepernick lost his starting job prior to the start of last season, and prior to his protest. He finished the season with a quarterback rating of 90.7 (ESPN rating is 55.2). That is better than the 78.5 he had in 2015 but a far cry from a 98.3 in 2012 where Kapernick led the Niners to the Super Bowl. No team is willing to pay millions of dollars for that kind of quarterback and I would hazard to guess Kaepernick won’t settle for anywhere near the league minumum.

Another knock against Kaepernick I believe is he is developing a reputation of being a bad teammate and a coach killer like another former Niner, Terrell Owens. I think Jim Harbaugh’s and Chip Kelly’s tenures as head coach of the Niners both ended badly as a result of Kaepernick. Kaepernick is so self-absorbed that he doesn’t think he needs any motivation to play better. He has put himself ahead of the team which makes for an uneasy situation in the locker room regardless of which side of the political spectrum you’re on. If that’s the attitude Kaepernick is going to take, he will be doing his sitting of the national anthem this season at home.

Kaepernick announced earlier this year that he is done with protesting claiming his message has been delivered. But that hasn’t made teams feel confident in signing the once promising quarterback. Kaepernick remains in football limbo, and it is due to his undoing and his alone.

PROTECTING THE SHIELD:

Kudos to the Detroit Red Wings organization for publicly condemning last weekend’s white nationalists gathering in Charlottesville, Virgina. Several demonstrators were seen carrying what looked like armoured shields with the Red Wings logo on it. It turns out a white supremacist group based out of Detroit modified the logo design to suit their group.

By all intents and purposes, this amounts to identity theft. Not to mention the Nazis were a socialist political party, so for opponents of these groups who say they are on “the right” are being dishonest at best. The Klu Klux Klan are no more to the right than the Black Panthers.

The Red Wings organization were quick to defend their brand and are considering taking legal action against the hate group. It is nice to see a sports organization take a stand instead of caving into the demands of fringe groups, namely those against the name Redskins.

Also see:

Athletes Should Stick to Sports
Sports is Not a Platform for Activism
Where are the Free Speech Advocates Now?

 

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What If Making Trades Was That Easy

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This Blue Jays season has been so disappointing that even the recent (and some would say expected) trades of Francisco Liriano and Joe Smith to contending teams were met with frowns by media and the like. Not so much that these players were dealt away, more like what we got in return. Pouting at Ross Atkins for making the trades is one thing, actually pulling the trigger on one is more difficult than people like to believe. Some folks blindly believe the Blue Jays can pick players up at a drop of the hat. And many of them work in sports media. If only it were that easy.

I have listened to sports talk radio for years and too many times I hear callers ask the host the same question: “why can’t (insert team here) get (insert player here)?” or “they should trade (insert player here) for (insert player here), that would be a great trade.” I remember hearing one caller insisting the Blue Jays should trade Kevin Pillar to the Dodgers for Clayton Kershaw, straight up. First off, you have to convince me the Dodgers would be willing to part with their ace for then Toronto’s young unproven outfielder. Secondly, the idea immediately comes off as a pipe dream. There is no logical basis to make the trade other than to promote phony outrage and anger that someone would not take such a trade proposal seriously. It makes you wonder the kind of people who listen to sports talk radio shows and whether that is the kind of people advertisers want to be associated with.

But let’s just say (for the sake of argument) acquiring the players we wanted was that easy. For starters (and I’m speaking from the Toronto sports fan’s perspective), the Blue Jays would surpass the Yankees as the franchise leader in World Series championships. Maple Leafs fans would be bragging about a Stanley Cup dynasty, not lamenting about not winning the Cup since 1967. If making a trade was that easy, no one would be talking about consequences such as the lack of parity it would cause or how the trade will impact the other team.

Another thing to think about is if trades were that easy, why would teams need general managers? If you believe the armchair GMs, all you need to do is pick up the phone, announce your demands and bingo, you get the player you want. Anybody can do that. In fact, why not just walk into a store and take whatever you want on the shelf? That kind of act would land you in jail but it seems some people feel it’s the way to do business in professional sports.

It probably took Alex Anthopoulos weeks if not days to negotiate the trade that brought Josh Donaldson to Toronto. There were those who didn’t want the team to part with Brett Lawrie, the Blue Jays’ third baseman at the time, who ended being one of the players the Blue Jays sent to Oakland for Donaldson. That was one of the challenges Anthopoulos had to face. Perhaps it is all Pat Glillick’s fault. Glillick made things pretty easy during his tenure as Blue Jays GM. His blockbuster trade in 1991 that brought Roberto Alomar and Joe Carter from San Diego led to two World Series Championships and now everyone thinks they can be a general manager in sports. But all kidding aside, if only making trades were that easy. What should the Blue Jays do about Jose Bautista? Why not ask Justin Bieber?

Also see:

Even if Bautista and Encarnacion Return, the Blue Jays Still Have Areas to Address
Firing Exposes Incompetence… Among Fans and Media
Get the Right Player First, then Spend the Money